The most wonderful time of the year is around the corner once again. Although many of us are looking forward to family gatherings and Thanksgiving feasts, others are dealing with overwhelming sadness.

The Holidays Are A Time For Cheer

The end of the year jampacks a ton of cheer. From work parties to family dinners, the holiday season is the best time to reconnect and form new memories with the ones we love.

Although the thought of chestnuts roasting on an open fire can have even the Grinch feeling warm, some of us are dealing with loss that just can’t be overshadowed by Christmas cheer.

Grieving During The Holidays Isn’t Easy

Losing a loved one is extremely difficult no matter what time of year, but the holiday season can make it especially difficult to deal with grief.

The main aspect of dealing with a loss in the family during the holidays? Doing it together.

“Compromise. What works for one person might not work for another, but remember that you’re in this together even if you’re not grieving the same. Talk. You’ll find there’s a way to make sure you all get what you need,” stated Nancy Weil, a grief support counselor.

Put Your Needs First

Although it’s great to rally together with family and friends, you don’t have to feel obligated to do so.

Everyone deals with grief differently, and that’s okay. Do whatever feels comfortable to you, and don’t be afraid you are going to offend anyone. Don’t really feel like sitting and smiling at a family gathering or party? Stay in for the night. Your loved ones will understand.

Feel like showing up to a holiday function, but not sure how you will feel about it once you’re there? Make sure to park somewhere where you won’t be backed in, and don’t be afraid to leave at any time if you’re not feeling up to it.

Most importantly—never feel your grief is a burden on your loved ones.

“They know what’s going on, and they still want you there. With them. They’re the people you care about and the people who love you. They’ll understand the tears, and they’ll understand the need to laugh. They want you there,” Weil stated.